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Nintendo Switch – Hardware Review

March 6, 2017

06 March 2017

It wasn’t meant to be, buying a Nintendo Switch on day 1. After all, I was critical of its high cost and, especially, its lack of games on launch, with only The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild the only premium title. While I’m a fan of the Zelda series, I’m not a rabid fan, and have only owned three games, they being Ocarina of Time and Majora’s Mask (both on N64), and A Link Between Worlds on 3DS. So it was wait for other games to make the Switch a more compelling purchase, which I estimated would be by the end of 2017.

Nintendo Switch Box - Hardware Review

Then something mysterious happened. In the lead up to the launch on 3 March, Fast RMX – a racing game in the mould of F-Zero and Wipeout – was announced as a release title, and Blaster Master Zero – a remake of the classic NES game Blaster Master – was announced as second week release. I was more interested, without being committed. The next piece of titillation was seeing Big W offering a bundle of the system and Zelda for $519, which was $40 off RRP, or $30 off the cheapest price elsewhere. They also had the Pro Controller at $15 cheaper than anywhere else I saw. Not that any of that prompted a change of mind.

Late on Thursday night, the day before its release, I’m on youtube, and I figured reviews should be out for Zelda. They were all 10/10 at the three most reputable sites I checked. I thought then and there, stuff it, I’ll buy one. I could wait 6 months and maybe save another $20 or so, or enjoy the thing now. The price was roughly only $80 more than a PS4 when you consider respective discounts, so it was off to Big W’s website to see if I could reserve or pre-order online. Nope. So I figured I’d sleep on the decision. I awoke without any change of mind, so drove to Southland to make a purchase, and suddenly I’m an owner of a Nintendo Switch, the first Nintendo home console I’ve bought since the GameCube in 2002. Banzai!

WHAT’S IT LIKE?

Impressive. Most impressive. Initially feeling quite small, the screen and joy-cons materialise into an impressive beast once all integrated as a single unit. Going through the set-up phase, instructions were to remove the joy-cons, and I found myself for the next 30 minutes or so using them in separate hands to complete the process, log into the eshop, buy Fast RMX, and then play the game. They really work nicely holding them separately. Then I attached them to the device, and that proved really comfortable too. It would be remiss not to say at this point that the screen is stunning! It’s one glorious device as a handheld and I’ll probably find myself using it this way most often, particularly since my main gaming these is on the 3DS.

Next step was to attach the joy-cons to the grip and try that with the device placed into the TV dock. There’s no compromises in the design here; it’s a quality controller, and as good as anything out there. While the buttons and control sticks are smaller than standard controllers, adjusting to them is fast, and if you can handle the setup on the 3DS handheld, then the grip and joy-con combination won’t be a problem. The buttons and control sticks are the same size, and combined with the grip the whole thing is more comfortable.

Nintendo Switch - Box contents - Hardware Review

Graphically, the biggest difference was that the large TV screen made Fast RMX seem even faster. That’s a function of the much closer perspective, not that it was actually faster. Everything remained crisp and super smooth too, with the only flaw I saw was lack of, or no, anti-aliasing or other technique to reduce jagged edges. Whether that’s Fast RMX itself or a limitation of the system, we won’t know until we see more games. Reviews of Zelda cited occasional slowdown as the only concern. Not that this affects gameplay for either title and, besides, the Switch is not supposed to be a system to satiate graphics whores. That’s the domain of PC gaming where continually pumping thousands of dollars into hardware is necessary to support their insecure geekwank tendencies and pretend they’re getting a better gaming experience.

Note that there’s no conventional d-pad with the standard Switch controller, only a four-button replacement on the left joy-con. While I quickly adjusted to that when flicking through the Switch menus and inputting information, how they would work in something like a fighting game remains to be seen. I’d have preferred a d-pad as I said in the preview, especially as I believe the 2-player tabletop mode will be the least utilised of the playing modes, and the points of a d-pad could have easily doubled for a button when using a single joy-con as a controller. They also need the supplied wrist strap attachment to make the alternate shoulder buttons bigger and the controller more comfortable in general, and it’s doubtful people will be carrying those around for the odd chance of 2-player tabletop gaming.

Finally, the Pro Controller, a separate, though not a necessary, purchase. Believe the hype, it’s probably the best controller ever designed. It feels so huge after coming from the joy-cons, with bigger buttons, a bigger spread between buttons, a bigger throw of the control sticks, and a beautiful feel. Again, with Fast RMX, there was a 5-minute adjustment period to it. Ergonomically, all the control options that the Switch offers are superb. That Nintendo could nail the design and quality while retaining this flexibility is astounding. They are back to their best days of the GameCube and SNES with their controllers. They were the best ever, until now.

Nintendo Switch Pro Controller - Review

STORAGE

Internal storage has actually been the biggest gripe about the system, with only 32gb on board. I don’t see the fuss. People are again in the PC or the latest console mindset of needing large drives to download games or support massive day one patches. Nintendo operates entirely differently by releasing only complete and fully tested games, and they expect you to buy hard copies for major releases. Those hard copies are also cheaper, where you can find Zelda for $80 easily in stores compared to $90 in the eshop. The only advantage of digital downloads is they remove the need to carry around game cards. In regard to game sizes, Zelda is 13.4gb, whereas Fast RMX is less than 1gb. Snipperclips is 1.6gb, while retro titles will be 100mb or less. Unless your plan is buying from the eshop only, then the most you’ll ever need to do is add a 64gb SD card for about $30.

HOME CONSOLE OR HANDHELD?

Nintendo have made a big deal that the Switch is a home console first, a portable one second. Technical specifications, using a mobile computing chip and limited storage capacity, suggests portable first, home console second. It doesn’t really matter. It will depend on the user. Personally, my favourite mode is a pseudo home/tabletop hybrid. I plonk it on the table next to me, lie back on the couch, and use either the grip or Pro Controller to play, while monitoring something on TV. The beauty of it is that everything synchronises so seamlessly. All controllers are immediately recognised and it’s just a matter of activating your preferred mode once turning the system on. Nintendo have done a stellar job with it that sense. The next test is the games. That is something that will require waiting until the end of the year before a proper evaluation.

Nintendo Switch Presentation – Hits and Misses

Warrior’s Video Games of 2016 & Nintendo Switch Preview

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